Get Political Wire by Email:



November 25, 2010


Bush's Non-Decision Decisions

The New Yorker has a scathing review of former President George W. Bush's new book:

"Every memoir is a tissue of omission and evasion; memoirs by public figures are especially unreliable. What's remarkable about Decision Points is how frequently and casually it leaves out facts, large and small, whose absence draws more attention than their inclusion would have..."

"The steady drip of these elisions and falsifications suggests a deeper necessity than the ordinary touch-ups of personal history. Bush has no tolerance for ambiguity; he can't revere his father and, on occasion, want to defy him, or lose charge of his White House for a minute, or allow himself to wonder if Iraq might ultimately fail. The structure of Decision Points, with each chapter centered on a key issue -- stem-cell research, interrogation and wiretapping, the invasion of Iraq, the fight against AIDS in Africa, the surge, the 'freedom agenda,' the financial crisis -- reveals the essential qualities of the Decider. There are hardly any decision points at all. The path to each decision is so short and irresistible, more like an electric pulse than like a weighing of options, that the reader is hard-pressed to explain what happened. Suddenly, it's over, and there's no looking back... In Bush's telling, the non-decision decision is a constant feature of his Presidential policymaking."














POLITICAL WIRE PODCAST

Political Wire Podcast Engaging conversations about elections and the political issues of the day. Subscribe via iTunes or RSS to get episodes automatically downloaded.


FREE NEWSLETTER




TRENDING VIDEO







PARTNERS











FOLLOW US