August, 2014

Senator’s Refusal to Resign Changed South Dakota Politics

The Sioux Falls Argus Leader has the fascinating story of how Sen. Karl Mundt (R-SD) suffered a massive stroke in 1969 but would not resign.

“Mundt, the state’s longest serving member in Congress, never would resume his duties as a senator, though he would occupy that office for three more years. His refusal to resign and allow outgoing Republican Gov. Frank Farrar to appoint his replacement before leaving office himself had profound consequences for South Dakota politics that ripple through today.”

“Political observers have speculated on why Mundt stayed, despite urgings from longtime friends, prominent local Republicans and even the Nixon White House. The episode is one of South Dakota’s prominent political mysteries.”

Rubio Changes Tune on Immigration

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) “is singing a new tune on immigration as he eyes a possible 2016 presidential run, but it may not be enough to win over disaffected conservatives just yet,” The Hill reports.

“Rubio was a leading champion of the comprehensive immigration reform bill that passed the Senate last year. But in a letter to President Obama and a series of four media interviews this week, he made clear that he now favors additional measures to secure the border before there is even talk of a pathway to legal status for those in the country illegally.”

The 5 Worst Campaigns of 2014

Washington Post: “Happy Labor Day weekend! In politics, this marks the final period of calm before a whirlwind nine weeks leading up to Election Day. It’s also a good time to reflect on the 2014 election cycle so far — full of dramatic twists, turns, unexpected triumphs and bitter disappointments. Sometimes all in the same day.”

“There have also been a handful of unmitigated disasters. We’re talking about the campaigns that failed miserably, after kicking off full of promise, in most cases.”

Hawaii Governor Blames Loss on Gay Marriage

Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie (D) told the Associated Press that he lost his bid for re-election in a Democratic primary because of his decision to call a special session to legalize gay marriage.

Said Abercrombie: “Republicans crossed over en masse to vote in the Democratic primary, and then the religious factor came in. Doctrinally I was outside the circle and paid for it.”

Democrats Rally Black Voters in Effort to Save Senate

“With their Senate majority imperiled, Democrats are trying to mobilize African-Americans outraged by the shooting in Ferguson, Mo., to help them retain control of at least one chamber of Congress for President Obama’s final two years in office,” the New York Times reports.

“In black churches and on black talk radio, African-American civic leaders have begun invoking the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, along with conservative calls to impeach Mr. Obama, as they urge black voters to channel their anger by voting Democratic in the midterm elections, in which minority turnout is typically lower.”

McConnell Campaign Manager Quits Amid Scandal

“Jesse Benton resigned as Sen. Mitch McConnell’s (R-KY) campaign manager following reports that he had emerged as a figure in an endorsement scandal during the 2012 Iowa presidential caucus,” the Louisville Courier Journal reports.

“In an emailed statement Friday evening, Benton denied any involvement in the scandal, in which Iowa state Sen. Kent Sorenson admitted receiving payments from U.S. Rep. Ron Paul’s campaign before switching his endorsement to the congressman. He had previously backed U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann.”

Obama Weighs Delay in Action on Immigration

President Obama “is considering a delay of his most controversial proposals to revamp immigration laws through executive action until after the midterm elections in November, mindful of the electoral peril for Democratic Senate candidates,” the New York Times reports.

“The president vowed in late June to act unilaterally, declaring a deep frustration with what he termed Republican obstruction in Congress… But now Mr. Obama and his aides appear to be stepping back from a firm commitment to that timing, a move that could draw fire from immigration advocacy groups who are expecting decisive action soon.”

Judge Dismisses McDaniel Challenge

A Mississippi judge has tossed out Chris McDaniel’s (R) challenge to that state’s June 24 GOP primary runoff results, ending another chapter in one of the most bitterly contested U.S. Senate primaries in recent memory, CNN reports.

Jackson Clarion Ledger: “McDaniel is taking the long holiday weekend to mull whether he’ll accept defeat from the June 24 GOP U.S. Senate primary, or continue his appeal to the state’s high court.”